JOSH ONE
Interview by Bethany Shady

WITH HIS NEWLY RELEASED DUALDISC ALBUM, NARROW PATH, AND TONS OF DJ GIGS ALL OVER THE WORLD, JOSH ONE IS BECOMING A HOUSEHOLD NAME. BETHANY SHADY HAD A QUICK CHAT WITH THE DJ/PRODUCER. DIG IT NOW, SUCKA!

Bethany Shady: How old were you when you moved from the Midwest to Southern California, and where in the Midwest did you come from?

Josh One: I was born in Sioux City, Iowa. I actually moved out to Los Angeles from Louisiana in 1984.

BS: Did you know anyone out here before you moved?

JO: I didnít know anyone out here when I got here.

BS: Do you ever see yourself moving back to the Midwest? If not, is it because of the weather, or because the diversity and acceptance of what you do is so much greater in California?

JO: I have a lot of family in the Midwest, so I could see myself living out there when I get a lot older. Iíd love to have another place there now to get away. I like the diversity of people out here a lot more, but the weather in the Midwest is great, if you can handle it.

BS: Do you think you might have an evil twin roaming around out there somewhere? If so, what do you think heís doing thatís so evil? Or are you the evil one of the two?

JO: I hope I have a good twin, because Iím probably the evil one.

BS: Growing up, were you influenced by your parents' or siblings' tastes in music?

JO: Yes, definitely.

BS: What artist or artists would you say strongly influenced you?

JO: The Beatles. And when I was ten I started listening to hip-hop, and I fell in love. I realized that it came from funk and jazz, so then I started listening to both of those, as well. Iím just really trying to create music that is timeless, like The Beatles did.

BS: Your first full-length album, Narrow Path, is now out with Myutopia Recordings on DualDisc [CD on one side, DVD on the other]. With this new outlet, do you feel more inclined to make videos for your music?

JO: I love the new technology. I feel blessed to be one of the first to use it. I would love to have a video for every song, since I feel that each one creates a mood. If you can also have a visual accompany a song, then the listener can get the full experience.

BS: Many reviewers have referred to your music as "soul-hop". How do you categorize your music?

JO: When I first heard the term "soul-hop" I actually thought it was good, seeing as how some other fool called it "ambient techno" before. I feel my music could fit into many categories. I would love to say itís a completely new style of music, but I can deal with the "soul-hop" term, too.

BS: Do you feel that youíre a politically-inclined person?

JO: I try not to get too involved in politics, to be honest.

BS: Whatís your opinion on artists using their music in order to get political messages out?

JO: I think my music has more of a positive message than a political one. I like the fact that artists use their music to portray any message, even if it is political; there is nothing worse than music without a message. I definitely feel music can change the thought process.

BS: What's your take on our current political situation?

JO: I think I liked it more when our president was a sax player.

BS: Do you think this past election was once again "stolen"?

JO: Iím not sure if it was stolen, but I do know there are a lot of people in other areas that arenít Democrats.

BS: A few months ago, you were in a life-threatening car accident. Did that moment of almost dying have any impact on how you view your life? Or did it just make you stop using your cell phone while driving?

JO: That feeling lasted a week, and then I was back to sticking needles in my arms. Just playin'. It did shake me up, and I do feel very lucky to be alive.